Introducing Hyperbarics


(2013) Director of Safety Michael A Vidafar experiences a monoplace hyperbaric oxygen dive in San Antonio, TX during a hyperbaric training course.

2013. Director of Safety and Education Michael A Vidafar experiences a monoplace oxygen dive to 2 ATA in San Antonio, TX during a hyperbaric training course.

DISCOVER HYPERBARIC OXYGEN THERAPY (HBOT)

Simply put, hyperbaric oxygen therapy involves placing and “enclosing” a candidate for therapy (“patient”) into an approved P.V.H.O. (“chamber”). The chamber is then filled with either air (21% oxygen) or 100% oxygen, and pressurized to a desired depth (usually between 1,520-2,280 mmHg, or between 2-3 ATA). The patient rests for a “total bottom time” of about 90 minutes, or whatever time is prescribed, and breathes 100% oxygen during that time.

Because of increased pressure, during theraputic “bottom time”, PO2 (a commonly assessed pulse-oximetry measurement, usually 99-100% in “well oxygenated” individuals) measurements increase off-the-charts to well above 1,500%.

Super-saturation of oxygen does very important things where healing is concerned. First, Bone marrow is inspired by the abundance of energy oxygen promises, and begins producing additional leukocytes (white blood cells) to fight infection and bacteria, and fibrinogen, which is a necessary cellular component for scabbing.

Also, small vessle “micro-capillaries” are newly able to “funnel” oxygen to places it could not previously reach.

Finally, common wound anaerobic (oxygen-free) bacteria will be killed by the consistent super-saturation of plasma oxygen.

A Sechrist 3200-Series "pneumatic" monoplace Hyperbaric Chamber

A Sechrist 3200-Series “pneumatic” monoplace Hyperbaric Chamber

DISCLAIMER: Long Island Hyperbaric Services, LLC does not explicitly endorse, promote, or advertise any particular product for the application, use, or consideration in conjunction to hyperbaric oxygen administration or wound care.

Please contact your physician if you are concerned about a chronic or non-healing wound.

If you are interested in learning about hyperbaric chambers, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, hyperbaric and diving medicine, or any modality related to oxygen, we recommend seeking advice from the Undersea & Hyperbaric Medical Society.

 

 

PLEASE BE AWARE OF ANY FACILITY, PERSON, ORGANIZATION, OR OTHER ENTITY PROVIDING NON-APPROVED “OFF-LABEL” HYPERBARIC OXYGEN THERAPY, OR PROVIDING OXYGEN THERAPY IN ENVIRONMENTS OUTSIDE OF THE REALM OF F.D.A., HOSPITAL, JOINT COMMISSION, OR UHMS OVERSIGHT.

IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS REGARDING A FACILITY’S LEGITIMACY OR PRACTICE, WE RECOMMEND CONTACTING THE UHMS.

If you feel you are experiencing a medical emergency, please call 9-1-1 immediately and wait for emergency service providers to arrive.

If you have recently returned from a dive of greater than 10 feet of sea water, and feel you may be experiencing signs and symptoms of decompression sickness (DCS) or “the bends,” the Diver’s Alert Network (DANS) recommends contacting them via their emergency hotline at +1-919-684-911, which is open and available 24/7, 365.